How to Get a Motorcycle Licence - Part Two

How to Get a Motorcycle Licence: Part Two

Motorcycling can be a sustainable and affordable way to travel and avoid traffic jams. Although don’t get us wrong, cars are still our fave! Still, if you’re keen to get a motorcycle licence we’ve put together a helpful guide…

 

Before you get a motorcycle licence you should know…
A couple of things… Most states require you to already have a car licence before your get your motorcycle licence. This ensures you’re familiar with safety on the road – AKA roadcraft.

 

Also, if you don’t feel comfy balancing on a bicycle, you may want to forgo the motorbike and simply don the leather jacket. Motorcycles require a high level of balance, coordination and focus focus focus!

 

However, if you’re still dreaming of a Yamaha in Prussian blue or a Kawasaki in dusty pink, we’ve got you covered.

 

In this second part of our state by state guide, we outline how to get your licence in the NT, SA and WA… In the wrong place? If you’re keen to know about the process in NSW, VIC, QLD, ACT and TAS instead, read how to get a motorcycle licence in the eastern states.

 

Motorcycle licence in NT

To get a motorcycle licence in Northern Territory you first need to be 16 years old. Once you’ve reached this benchmark, it’s onto these next steps.

 

Class R learner licence

There are three steps to getting your learner licence: a theory test, learner riding test and an eye test.

 

  • The rider knowledge theory test

This is a 30-question multiple-choice on rules of the road. Prep for the test with the practice rider knowledge test. You need to ace at least 26 of these questions to pass.

 

  • The learner riding test

This practical learner riding test can be completed in one of two ways (you only need to choose one):

 

    1. Sign up for a Motorcyclist Education Training and Licensing (METAL) pre-learner course
    2. Take a balance and stability test, called the motorcyclist operator skills test (MOST).

 

  • Eye Test

Provide a recent eye examination from an optometrist or do your eye test with the Motor Vehicle Registry (MVR) office. The MVR will process and issue your learner’s licence.

 

Once you receive this you can begin riding. Whoopee! Just be sure to familiarise yourself with the learner licence restrictions that apply.

 

R class provisional licence or R class restricted licence

Once you’ve had your learner licence for 6 months, you can complete the intermediate pre-provisional rider training course. Once you pass this course, you get one of the following:

 

    • 1-year restricted rider licence if you already have a car licence
    • 2-year provisional rider licence if you don’t have a car licence and you’re under 25 years of age
    • 1-year provisional rider licence if you don’t have a car licence but you’re over 25 years old


Class R open

Once you complete your provisional or restricted licence period above, you are eligible for a full Northern Territory rider licence! You’ll need to pay a fee to the MVR where you will be issued with your class R licence.

 

PD insurance: How to get your motorcycle licence

 

Get licenced to ride a motorcycle in SA

You’ll need to have your car driver permit (or your Ls or Ps at least). If not there’s a theory test at any Service SA customer service centre to get you up to speed.

 

Next, you can move onto these steps:

 

Learner licence

Complete your basic training with a 2-day pre-licence training course. This will give you essential riding skills. You’ll get an endorsed ‘Approval to obtain a learner’s permit’. Take this to any Service SA customer service centre within 12 months to get your learner’s, which is valid for 2 years.

 

Once that’s done, you can now ride learner approved motorcycles.

 

R-date licence

Once you’ve had your learners for 6 months, you’re eligible to complete the steps to get your R-date licence.

 

Complete the Rider Safe advanced training course. On successful completion, you’ll receive your certificate of competency. You can prep for the course here.

 

Take your certificate of competency to any Service SA customer service centre to apply for the R-date licence. If you have a car licence, the new learner approved motorcycle licence gets added to this. If you not, you can apply for a provisional licence, provided you’ve had your Ls for 12 months and are 17 years old.

 

Be sure to get to know the restrictions for the R-date or provisional licence before you go anywhere on your bike.

 

R-class licence

Once you’ve had your R-date licence for 12 months you automatically transfer to the R-class licence. This is the final stage of getting a motorcycle licence. You don’t need to do any further testing and it’s optional to update your licence card from R-date to R-class.

 

Get a motorcycle licence in Western Australia

 

Motorcycle diaries in WA

In Western Australia, you can apply for your learners permit from age 15 years 6 months. The steps are as follows…

 

R-N learner permit

Submit your completed drivers licence application and pass the motorcycle theory test at the Western Australia Department of Transport. The test has 35 multiple choice questions. You’ll need to score 28 to pass.

 

After you get the big tick, familiarise yourself with the R-N learner permit restrictions and you can begin riding!

 

Provisional licence R-E class

Once you have held the learner permit for 6 months, complete the next steps to get your R-E licence. To get this intermediate level of licence, you must be at least 16 years and 6 months.

 

Complete the hazard perception test at the WA Department of Transport – a computer-based test that checks your ability to gauge hazardous situations. Here’s a sample test you can use to prep.

 

You’ll need to amass 50 hours of riding experience (unless you already have your car driver licence). Record at least 5 hours at night until you reach your 50 hour mark and log this in the Learn&Log app.

 

You’ll need to be at least 17 years old before you’re allowed to do the practical driving assessment (PDA) with the WA Department of Transport. Here’s the drive safe handbook to help you prep… Once you pass, you’ll be issued with your provisional licence.

 

But wait… Don’t go anywhere until you’ve familiarised yourself with the new riding restrictions.

 

R-Class licence

Once you’ve been riding with a provisional licence for 2 years, you’re ready to take the practical assessment for an R class licence. This is a final assessment to check your general riding skills. Once you pass, you’ll have attained your complete motorcycle licence.

 

Congrats!

 

Easy rider

Now we’ve given you the overview, remember this is only a guide. Rules and regulations may be updated at any time. View the complete up to date procedures for each state here:

 

 

And remember to wear full length clothes and appropriate safety gear when riding a motorcycle. Otherwise, skinned knees will be the least of your concerns.

 

Motorcycle diaries – what to remember!

Vin Diesel says, “It wasn’t until I got my first motorcycle that I understood the thrill of speed.” However, much freedom you get riding a motorcycle, remember to give your car the love it deserves with affordable car insurance

 

Because sometimes a girl just wants the freedom that comes with a car. Like getting to work with your new sneakers and freshly washed hair still intact. Or those big grocery shopping excursions. Plus add kids.

 

How to get a motorcycle licence – over to you

Have you and your mates recently started a motorcycle club? Or maybe you got the jacket but not the bike and are living happily ever after driving your car 😊. Send us a note below and share your top tips for being a motorist.

 

 

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